Asian Cinema Fund 2018

2011 Projects

2011 Script Development Fund Projects

Project SATRA
Category Asian Project
Project SATRA
Director Sheron DAYOC
Country Philippines
Director's Profile Sheron Dayoc is a Mindanaon filmmaker and a visual artist. He comes from a Protestant family and was educated in a catholic institution, and raised in a Christian-Muslim inhabited City – Zamboanga. Sheron is an alumnus of the Asian Film Academy in Busan IFF 2008 and Next Masters Class of Tokyo FILMeX 2010. He has produced several documentaries, which include Asian Pitch (MediaCorp/NHK Japan) 2008 documentary [A Weaver's Tale] which won him a Certificate of Creative Excellence from the U.S. International Film and Video Festival 2010. [HALAW (Ways of the Sea)], his first feature length film won Special Mention, NETPAC at Berlin, 2011 and traveled in film festivals all over the world. The film also won best film, best director, best actor, and best editing at the Philippines’ Cinemalaya Independent Film Festival in 2010.
 
Synopsis
Set in the Southern Philippines, where a separatist movement has intensified its war offensive to assert their freedom and autonomy, Satra, ethnic weaver struggles to survive while trying to live a normal life. Meanwhile, the town’s spirits warn a danger that might soon reach their town. These spirits are believed to have been victims of a conflict that has been ongoing for decades, caught in the crossfire. The war reaches their remote area, with brutal and devastating results. The village is burned, and many of its people massacred, including Satra. Satra enters the spirit world while the townsfolk seek refuge in an evacuation center like other spirits and survivors trying to live a normal life. The tapestry will be unraveled like Satra’s impeccable weave, fiber upon fiber, into one cinematically colorful pattern and provokingly engaging fabric.
Director's Note
Spirits and mortals are woven like fabric, like fibers on the loom. The scenes weave to form the story of Satra, the village weaver. The thread of conflict and land-grabbing interrupts the beauty and peace of Mindanao. Its rich and colorful culture is sewn into danger and violence. These interwoven moods and dimensions create one tapestry. It’s a recurring fabric pattern, like what troubled us then will trouble us now and also in the future. It’s a message viewed from a Mindanaon perspective. It should not be fabricated as the power-players wish, as the picture manipulated for their own gain will lead us to everlasting injustice. It should be a story of my people. This tapestry is our land’s soul, expressed through the craft I can express on film.
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