Asian Cinema Fund 2018

2008 Asian Network of Documentary (AND) Fund

Project Money and Honey
Category PUFS Fund
Project Money and Honey
Director LEE Ching-Hui
Country Taiwan
Director's Profile LEE Ching-Hui has been an independent filmmaker since 1996. She is currently a lecturer in the Visual Communication department of DAYEH University. Her works convey a social awareness of gender and family issues. [Money and Honey] is the fourth documentary in the series, “The Realm of Womenhood” after [Where is My Home?] (1999), [The Ballads of Grandmothers] (2003) which won the First Prize at the Women’s Film Festival in Seoul, Best Individual Achievement at the Taipei Film Festival and the Golden Harvest Award for Excellence in Video, and [City of Memories](2007).
 
Synopsis
[Money and Honey] will focus mainly on caretakers from The Philippines and other countries. Their marital life has changed due to the circumstances in which they take on the responsibility of the livelihood of their family. The film will attempt to depict the interaction between these foreign laborers and the employer, agent, and the elderly and their family. It also illustrates how migrant workers travel between countries in the trend of globalization. Through their work, marriage, and family status, we have a window into their struggle and their will to survive.
Director's Note
Migration is a constant phenomenon of human civilization, and with the growth of globalization, this phenomenon is in a stage of rapid development. [Money and Honey] tries to discover the migration of foreign laborers in Asia in relation to the changes in economy, politics, and cultures. Migrant workers are a very important element of Asian modern society. Taiwanese society also has very close connections with numerous migrant workers. The film’s intension is to show life from the perspective of these overworked migrant workers in the hope of finding justice and a world where everyone can respect one another. It also has the potential to influence the changing labor policies in Taiwan, to leave a sort of documentation, and to provide an opportunity for self-reflection.
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