Asian Cinema Fund 2018

2013 Asian Network of Documentary (AND) Fund

Project Prisoner Of Consicence
Category Dong-Eui Cinema Fund
Project Prisoner Of Consicence
Director KIM Cheol Min
Country Korea
Director's Profile With the dream to change the world through moving images he came to Seoul in 2oo2. Since then he has been making films about labor, democracy, human rights, and Korean reunification. His short documentaries includes Unforgettable Grudge (2004), I go Joseon School (2005), The Reason Why He Fight (2006), and The Witness of the Time, Looking at the Candle Lights (2007). In 2011 his feature documentary The Reason Why I Step was received 2011 AND Fund and screened at Busan International Film Festival.
 
Synopsis
This is a story of YOON Ki-jin. As he became the leader of a student movement group and he was blacklisted by the law enforcement force. Since then, he was been hiding from the law for ten years and incarcerated for five years. He married HWANG sun, who was also a member of the same student movement group and he became a father for two daughters. He couldn’t fulfill his duty as a husband and father, because of having been listed on the blacklist. In 2008, YOON was arrested and spent 3 years in prison, but soon after being reunited with his family in seven years he was prosecuted for violating the Nation Security Act and was taken to court. Now before the trail begins, YOON’s every moment spent with his family and friends are precious, beyond words can describe.
Director's Note
In order to protect ones conscience and thought in the a nation divided in half, Korea, a blacklisted man lives as wanted man for ten years and spends five years in prison. The freedom of conscience and thought are principal human rights being protected by the Constitution, but it doesn’t apply to the National Security Act of Korea. A thought can be punishable, specially a thought about accepting North Korea regime. It is even dangerous to use North Korean terms and words. The fear of a divided nation paralyzes the rational thinking and freedom. Aren’t we all then locked in a bigger prison?
Festivals
Still Cut
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