Asian Cinema Fund 2018

2018 Asian Network of Documentary (AND) Fund

Project The Way to You
Category Korean Project
Project The Way to You
Director BYUN Gyuri
Country South Korea
Director's Profile With her admiration for life that reconciles with personal values of life, she was fascinated by documentaries to explore and intervene activism in practice. After completing Independent Documentary Production courses in MediACT, she participated in the production of Act in Media in Samcheok (2014). She worked as a producer at Guro Community Radio where she met telecommunication workers and started a podcast about their strike. This paved her way to directing Play On (2017). She joined PINKS after she met them in 2014 when LGBTQ activists held a rainbow sit-in protest at Seoul City Hall. She produces documentary works based on feminist sensibility as a way of creating dialogues and seeking solidarity.
 
Synopsis
Can your life be the same once you learn that your child is queer? Parents in their 40s and 50s, who were supposed to be stabilizing their lives, face a new life crisis. Vivian, Jimmy, Nabi, Lala, Ji-In, Ha-nuel, and Gukhwa-Hyanggi find out that their children are queer. They cannot forget the day they figured out the sexual orientation and gender identity of their children, the memory of which suddenly resurfaces in their everyday life - at work, between friends, and in public spaces. The heteronormative spaces, seemingly natural, become increasingly uncomfortable and troubling as they realize the everyday discomfort and alienation that their children go through as sexual minorities. As time passes by, these parents learn to reflect on the pain inflicted on their children by their words of ignorance and discrimination, which make them feel apologetic… Will they be able to face the world to overcome the deep-seated social discrimination to stand with their children?
Director's Note
These are parents who one day figured out that their child is queer. They, at first, rejected their child’s sexual identity and drove themselves into a time of agony with repeated doubts and denials, blaming themselves for “raising their child wrong.” Parents feel chased by the stigma as they are forced to remain silent or to keep explaining about the sexual identity of their child. Why are sexual minorities considered “abnormal”? What is “normal” after all? What makes parents feel guilty when they find out about their child’s sexual difference, and why do they become a target of criticism? Why do they go through a completely different life with hardships and challenges when the only thing that′s changed is their recognition of their child’s difference? With these questions, this documentary aims to facilitate a dialogue about the life conditions of sexual minorities and the deep-seated discrimination against them.
Festivals
Still Cut
Contact
dt6452@daum.net